Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi

BBFC 12A 2hrs 32mins

 

 

Full disclosure: I have never been a Star Wars fan. I don’t own any toys; I have never read any of the extended universe novels; no posters adorn my walls; the prequels (The Phantom Menace, Attack of the Clones and The Revenge of the Sith) didn’t upset me, only bored me; I don’t own any of the dvd’s; I even had to look up the names of the prequels just now.

This, of course, does not mean I don’t recognise their value or, that in any way, I dismiss them as fan-serving fluff. The job of a film reviewer is to try to honestly convey to the reader what they’ve seen up there on the screen, to give a completely unbiased opinion based upon a number of criteria (such as storytelling, direction, acting and technical merits), to be as informed as possible and to try not to bore said reader in the process. Oh, and avoid spoilers… yes, definitely avoid spoilers.

I tell you all of this for one simple reason. I want you to know that Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi is not just a great Star Wars movie, it is a really, really great movie in its own right: it achieves exactly what it sets out to do and does so in a way that never is boring, flabby or uninteresting; moves its characters and plot forward in a satisfying and, sometimes, moving arcs; it stays true to the series ethos and mythos whilst introducing new and interesting riffs upon them and, along the way, it corrects a course-direction that the prequels (and even The Force Awakens to some extent) managed to muddle and muddy.

Yes, The Last Jedi works… with a few caveats.

Picking up directly where Episode VII: The Force Awakens ended Rey (Daisy Ridley) has found the now reclusive Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill) on Ahch-To and seeks answers to not only her heritage but to her place in the universe. The Resistance, led by General Leia (Carrie Fisher), is on the run from The First Order and fiercely outnumbered. New alliances must be forged and old questions beg answers.

So far, so Empire Strikes Back.

Where The Force Awakens was basically A New Hope remastered, The Last Jedi shares a whole heap of DNA with The Empire Strikes Back. But, unlike its predecessor, Jedi manages to shine despite its familiarity and not because of it. It’s the difference between a Woolworth’s Top of the Pops collection and something like Public Enemy’s It Takes a Nation of Millions… (the former being a cover version album, the latter taking the familiar and creating something new and exciting with it). Replace Ahch-To with the Dagobah scenes of Luke’s training; the neo-Vegas glitz of Canto Bight with Cloud City; the shock revelation of Rey’s true ancestry and cliff-hanger ending and you’ve got Empire 1.2. What writer/director Rian Johnson manages to achieve though is something always fresh, sometimes surprising and, ultimately, emotionally satisfying.

New layers have been added to familiar characters like Rey, Finn (John Boyega), Poe Dameron (Oscar Isaac), Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) and even Luke Skywalker. Existing characters are expanded upon giving them both motivation and weight, specifically General Hux (Domhall Gleeson), Captain Phasma (Gwendoline Christie) and Supreme Leader Snoke (Andy Serkis) – a villain so repulsive he could easily have risen to power wearing a red “Make The Galaxy Great Again” baseball cap. New characters are introduced that will immediately become fan favourites like Rose Tico (Kelly Marie Tran), DJ (Benicio Del Toro) and purple-haired Resistance fleet Vice Admiral Amilyn Holdo (Laura Dern). There’s plenty of spectacular battles, an all-timer light sabre duel, emotional highs and devastating losses. There’s even a new shade of grey introduced into what is, essentially, a universe of black hats versus white hats that, if carried forward and expanded upon, will move the Star Wars Universe in a deeper, more nuanced direction.

I’m desperately trying not to give too much away but I have to address the elephant in the room: That The Last Jedi is the slam-bang in the middle of a three act story and, as such, it struggles to be anything but the set-up for the final chapter. This is a problem that all trilogies face and, though it is probably the best instalment since Empire, it’s difficult to judge it as its own thing. The whole Canto Bight storyline will become clearer in the context of the whole, I’m sure, but here it feels slightly crow-barred in and excessive to the needs of the story despite introducing new characters Rose and DJ and that much needed shade of grey. It’s not that the Canto Bight sequences are bad, far from it, but here they tend to feel like something you’d get in an extended edition dvd rather than an essential part of the story.

There’s also a fear that new elements of the film have been added simply for their merchandising potential than as necessary plot points. I’m thinking specifically about the Porgs (cute rabbit/penguin hybrid critters, plushie-toy-friendly creations coming to a Christmas stocking near you) which add little to the plot but potentially enormous earnings beyond the movie.

The tragic loss of Carrie Fisher hangs heavy over The Last Jedi and it would take a hard heart not to break over her final scene as Leia, a scene that even without the actress’s death would have audiences reaching for the handkerchiefs. It’s the kind of emotion we should have had in the previous episode for Han Solo but were denied through awful writing and direction, but alas.

So, did Star Wars Episode VIII: The Last Jedi make a fan of me? Only for its two and a half hour running time, but during that time I was as thrilled and invested as any fanboy. It’s a transportive experience, the kind that only great cinema can offer and, trust me, this is great cinema.

Andy Oliver

 

Colchester Classics – Classical Music Picks for December 2017

OUR CLASSICAL MUSIC COLUMNIST LIZ LEATHERDALE, FOUNDER AND OWNER OF COLCHESTER CLASSICS, BRINGS YOU HER PICK OF DECEMBER’S CLASSICAL MUSIC EVENTS IN, AND AROUND, COLCHESTER.

Classics

Celebrate, rejoice, rise up and praise –  the festive season has arrived!

This month is full of music celebrating Christmas with a cornucopia of concerts – some crammed full with carols.

Here Comes Christmas is the popular annual concert of music for voices, brass quintet and organ held in the Edwardian splendour of Colchester’s Town Hall. Colchester Choral Society, conducted by Ian Ray, will be joined by children from both Birch Primary and Heathlands Primary Schools and accompanied by organist Dr Gillian Ward-Russell. After the concert there is a chance to pop to the Mayor’s Parlour for some mulled wine and festive treats. Sunday December 10 at 4pm in Colchester’s Moot Hall.

Tickets: £8 from Manns Music, Colchester.

Next Saturday (16 December), Gillian Ward-Russell will be conducting the Maldon Choral Society in a Christmas Carol Concert featuring the choir of Elm Green School.  Saturday December 16 at 7.30pm in All Saints’ Church, Maldon.

Tickets: £7 on the door.

Often considered to be the music for Christmas, Handel’s popular oratorio, Messiah, is sung in full or part at this time year. On Saturday 9 December, the Choir of St Mary’s Maldon will be joined by its favourite orchestra, Pegasus Baroque, in a full performance of the famous oratorio conducted by Colin Baldy. The performance is on Saturday 9 December at 7.30pm in St Mary’s Church, Church Street, Maldon. CM9 5HP.

Tickets are available from the Maldon Tourist Board (01621 856503) and on Eventbrite.

Also on Saturday 9 December Philip Smith will be directing the St Botolph’s Music Society Orchestra from the keyboard in music by J S Bach. Scarlatti’s Christmas Cantata and the world premiere of Nativity Thoughts, composed by the Society’s founder Colin Nicholson, will be performed by the society’s choir and orchestra.  Saturday December 9 at St Botolph’s Church, Colchester from 7.30pm.

Tickets: £12 www.sbms.org.uk

Conductor Patrick McCarthy and his orchestra, the Colchester Philharmonic, will be accompanying Christmas concerts on the next two Saturdays.  On December 9 they will be at Witham Public Hall with Witham Choral presenting Sing Christmas! at 7.30 p.m. including excerpts from Messiah, audience carols and Vaughan Williams’ Fantasia on Christmas Carols with baritone soloist Alastair Merry.

Tickets £12 and £5 (full-time education) at the door or phone 0345 017 8717.

On 16 December the Harwich & Dovercourt Choral Society will perform Messiah Part One with mezzo Elaine Henson and famous carols by Holst and Rutter plus carols for audience. The concert starts at 7.00 p.m. in St Nicholas’ Church, Harwich.

Tickets are £12 and £3 (full-time education) at the door.

If you have a forthcoming concert of classical music, you would like previewed, contact Liz Leatherdale on 0800 999 6994.

www.colchesterclassics.co.uk

www.facebook.com/ColchesterClassics

Twitter @ClassicalCDs

www.linkedin.com/in/lizleatherdale1/

www.instagram.com/ColchesterClassics

Start your love affair with Classical Music at www.colchesterclassics.co.uk and take a minute to watch their company video: 

Liz Leatherdale

 

 

 

 

 

 

Liz Leatherdale

Turtle Bay Preview Night

I’ve been lucky enough to have visited Jamaica a few times, though sadly not in more recent years, and I’m a huge fan of the island, its charming people, the laid back culture and its delicious food. So I was delighted to receive an invitation to the VIP Preview Night of Colchester’s newest dining experience, the Caribbean themed Turtle Bay.

Located in Greytown House next door to the Town Hall, this previously drab building has been wondrously transformed into three brand new restaurant units, the first of which to open, in time for Christmas, is Turtle Bay.

The Caribbean vibe hits you the moment you walk in and get your first look at this cool beach shack themed restaurant that transports you to sunnier climes. The ‘island hut’ bar takes centre stage at the front of the restaurant, ideal if you are waiting for a table or just popping in for a cocktail (more about them later) or a glass of cold Red Stripe lager. With reggae music playing in the background you really could be in a Jamaican beach bar.


Reclaimed wood and chequer-plate, lights hanging from beer crates, giant paintings on brick walls along with the open ‘street kitchen’ and a raised veranda seating area at the back of the dining area are just some of the features and little touches that give this restaurant its charismatic vibe for your unique dining experience.

And what an experience it is! Let’s start with the cocktails. They have over forty, yes FORTY, different rums from across the Caribbean which they use to make classic cocktails with, of course, a special Turtle Bay twist. I had a fair crack at working my way through the cocktail list, aided by the very friendly and knowledgeable Turtle Bay team who were happy to recommend their favourites, which of course it would have been rude not to try. Now I’m not really a rum drinker, in fact I would go so far as to say I’ve never really liked it very much, but each of my cocktails beautifully hit the spot, and after also trying a couple of neat rums too I’m now a convert.

But enough about the cocktails. Every single item from the selection of mouth-watering dishes we were served was a delight to eat. From the crispy panko coated whitebait nibbles on the bar, the sweetcorn fritters, crispy okre, and sweet plantain in the vegetarian platter, to the jerk chicken were as delicious and authentic as you could hope for. But the curry goat stole the show for me. Every trip I’ve made to Jamaica has begun with curry goat and a Red Stripe, and Turtle Bay’s take on this classic dish was up there with the best of them I’ve eaten in the Caribbean. With Sean Paul playing in the background happy memories from trips gone by soon came flooding back.


Just when I thought I couldn’t eat another morsel along came a selection from the Puddings menu (yes they do call it that) which included their rum and raisin bread pudding and sticky black treacle pudding. Now I’m not really much of a dessert (or pudding!) eater but I gave in and tried a couple and they really were absolutely delicious, and the staff happily offered to pack up what we couldn’t eat to take home with us, which delighted my daughter to find she had Caribbean puddings to add to her lunchbox this morning.


Talking about home, we were glad it was a fifteen minute walk away which gave us a chance to walk off some of the food we had eaten as I really did have that Christmas Day stuffed full feeling!

Special thanks go to all the staff who worked so hard last night to make our preview night so memorable. Turtle Bay is going to be a welcome addition to Colchester High Street when it officially opens on 4th December, expanding the town’s dining options as well as a few waistlines I should think!

www.turtlebay.co.uk/colchester

@turtlebayuk

www.facebook.com/TurtleBayRestaurants/

EMAIL

Simon Crow

 

When Question Time Came to Colchester

When David Dimbleby announced at the end of BBC’s Question Time the other week that the long running political panel show would be coming to Colchester I was on the website requesting a ticket even before the end credits had finished rolling.

The online form asked for information such as which political party I support and how I voted in the Brexit referendum, and several days later on the Monday before the show I received an email telling me to phone a lady called Alison if I was still interested in attending. So I duly called the lovely Alison who asked me for two questions I would like to ask the panel, telling me that I would be asked again on the night as things can change dramatically in politics in only a few days. Once I’d done this she confirmed I’d been accepted to be in the studio audience and explained how the show is pre-recorded then broadcast later in the evening. Moments later my e-ticket appeared in my inbox with instructions to arrive at the Town Hall, where the show was being filmed, between 6pm and 6.30pm.

On the day I met up with some friends, who had also been lucky enough to get tickets, for a quick livener at  Three Wise Monkeys before we made our way to the town hall where we were directed to the Jury Room on the first floor and given cards to write our name, occupation and our questions on. There was tea and coffee too, and with all 100 of us who would be in the audience gathered in the room we had quite an excited atmosphere going on.

We filled our cards in and handed them in to the Question Time team, then to our delight David Dimbleby entered the room to brief us about what to expect, running through the structure of the show and reminding us to applaud and to react anything said that we liked… or didn’t like.


Eventually we made our way up to the Moot Hall where the familiar Question Time set awaited us, which was a little surreal to see in a room I am very familiar with. A friend and I had become split up from our little group and were directed to seats in the second row. Once everyone was seated the names of those who had been chosen to ask their questions were read out one by one so they could stand up to identify themselves while the camera and sound teams ensured they would be able to get to them when their time came. They were then led away by a member of the crew for a briefing before returning a few minutes later.


I was delighted to see that one of those chosen was local actor Vince Rayner who made regular appearances in Hi-de-Hi and Allo Allo, and I had high hopes that when he was asked his question he would preface it with “Listen very carefully, I will say this only once…”

Finally the night swung into action and the floor manager invited five members of the audience to sit at the desk and form a mock panel which he then hosted. An audience member asked a question and we were off! I was actually surprised how heated the toing and froing between the panel and the audience became considering this was just to warm us up, but that was of course exactly what they wanted to get us all in the right mood for what was to come.

Once that was finished David Dimbleby and the panel finally appeared and we were really in business. The panel for our show was:

Greg Clark MP – Conservative Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy

Diane Abbott MP – Labour Shadow Home Secretary

Bernard Hogan Howe – former Metropolitan Police Commissioner

Sir Stuart Rose – former CEO of Marks and Spencer

Dreda Say Mitchell – crime writer

The first question, about capitalism, was asked by a lady a few rows behind me us, and we were off. I won’t bore you with the details of the ensuing debate, suffice to say it was fascinating to actually be part of it after having watched Question Time on Thursday nights for many years. My only beef was that where we were sitting my view of David Dimbleby was blocked by a camera. I could see the panellist on either side of him, just not the great man himself.

Unfortunately, about thirty minutes into the recording, out of the corner of my eye I saw someone falling from their seat in the front row, accompanied by a thud and a groan. The debate continued for several awkward seconds during which it wasn’t clear whether the panel didn’t realise what had happened or just didn’t know what to do until directed, but eventually the floor manager stepped towards the desk and told them something had happened to an audience member and to stop. People nearby rushed to the aid of the lady on the floor who I heard tell them she had a spinal injury and not to move her. David Dimbleby came over to find out what was going on for himself and spoke to us to keep us informed, 999 was dialled, and some minutes later paramedics arrived. Before long David was speaking to us again to tell us they had been informed that the lady couldn’t be moved for another hour so the recording was going to be abandoned and they would only be broadcasting what they had recorded up until the lady was taken sick.


So that was the rather abrupt end of our Question Time in Colchester experience and it only remains to say I hope the lady makes a full recovery and the show comes back to our town soon.

Simon Crow

New Changing Places Facility is Opens

After months of waiting Colchester’s newest Changing Places toilet facility for people with complex care needs was opened in the town centre library this morning.


It is estimated that there are ¼ million people in the UK who for one reason or another cannot use a standard disabled toilet. This can include people with profound and multiple learning disabilities, motor neurone disease, multiple sclerosis, cerebral palsy, as well as some elderly people.

Local resident Scott Everest, whose 13 year old son Johnnie is physically disabled and attends Lexden Springs School, has been campaigning for the past 18 months for this new facility that will make visits to the town centre less stressful for those who may need to use it, as well as for their families and careers.

Scott has been helped by Essex County Council Councillor Sue Lissimore, who is also Scotts Colchester Borough Council ward Councillor in Prettygate. Sue worked hard to access funding from Essex County Council for the equipment and construction and liaised with Colchester Borough Council who agreed to clean and maintain it.

The new Changing Places, which is about the size of a single garage to give the user and anyone accompanying them plenty of space that a standard toilet doesn’t provide, includes a height adjustable changing bench, a hoist that can be moved around the room on runners affixed to the ceiling, a privacy screen and height adjustable sink.


The ribbon cutting ceremony was carried out by Councillor John Aldridge the Chairman of ECC, and attended by Johnnie, Sue, and Scott. A clearly delighted Scott told us after the brief ceremony: “My family and son are so grateful for the changing places facility in Colchester library, my thanks go out to Sue Lissimore my Councillor for securing funding with the Essex County council short breaks team led by the hard working Up Mason. I would also like to thank Colchester Borough Council for agreeing to look after the cleaning and on-going maintenance of the facility. It brings a sense of family life where now, as a family we can all visit town together and address sanitary needs without having to change my son on a cold, hard, wet and urine soaked floor.”

Well done Scott and Sue for making a difference to the lives of many!

You can watch the ceremony HERE on the Colchester 101 Facebook.

Simon Crow

A Taste of the Carribean Coming to the High Street


After months of speculation about who would be moving into the three restaurant units that have been created in Greytown House next door to the Town Hall in the High Street we can reveal that Turtle Bay Caribbean restaurant will be opening on December 4th.

Established in 2010, Turtle Bay has 40 restaurants across the UK employing over 1000 people, with a further 50 jobs now being created in Colchester. An £800k investment has created a 160 seat restaurant with its own design which will be unique to Colchester featuring an open ‘street kitchen’ and a raised veranda seating area where they will be bringing their trademark jerk spices, sunshine-inspired cocktails, and island spirit to the town.

Turtle Bay offers an eclectic menu of 50+ authentic Caribbean dishes offering a huge choice of bold flavours and rustic dishes. Signature dishes that Colchester diners can look forward to include their famous jerk chicken and curry goat, but there’s plenty for all to choose from including burgers, salads and a great collection of dishes for vegetarians, vegans and gluten free diners. All inspired by the laid back vibe of the Caribbean

The menu also includes ‘Cutters’  – inspired by Beach Shacks and Street Hawkers of the Caribbean Islands which are perfect for sharing over cocktails – the Jerk BBQ Pit, Curry One Pots, a fabulous Lunch menu, and a dreamy desserts collection.

This is fuss-free soul food for individuals that love, and live, to eat!

The standalone ‘island hut’ bar will offer a staggering 40+ hand-picked rums (yes 40!) from across the Caribbean used to create classic cocktails with a Turtle Bay twist, as well as a magnificent mix of signature cocktails too. And even better news, the whole list of cocktails are available as 2-4-1’s during Happy Hour.

We can’t wait!

www.turtlebay.co.uk/colchester

@turtlebayuk

www.facebook.com/TurtleBayRestaurants/

EMAIL

Simon Crow

 

Justice League

(BBFC 12A 2hrs 1min)

 

Some films you want to keep forever, to cherish and pop in the dvd player whenever you need a pick-me-up or guaranteed thrill or even the comfort of something familiar. Other films are your third choice in a three-for-twenty-quid promotion because you’ve found two movies you really want, can’t find that third one and… well, it’ll do to make up the numbers.

Unfortunately, Justice League is that second kind of movie. It’s alright. You might want to watch it on a rainy afternoon or you’re just after something to stick on while you’re doing the ironing. In fact, the less attention you pay it the better it seems: ignore the gaping plot holes, the awful dialogue, the Playstation 2 era special effects, the muddy colour palette and derivative villain and you might just find something to enjoy. Though that’s a big ask, unless you’re an eight-year-old, dyed-in-the-wool DC fanboy.

The plot, such as it is, follows on from the risible Batman Vs. Superman: Dawn of Justice: Superman is dead (or is he?), the Earth has no protector (or does it?), those flashbacks and flashforwards start to make sense (or do they?) and everybody bonds over the fact that their moms are all called Martha (not really, but entirely possible). There are a bunch MacGuffins called Mother Boxes (a kind of DC version of Marvel’s Infinity Stones or Harry Potter’s Horcruxes) hidden on the planet and interdimensional baddie Steppenwolf (voiced by Ciaran Hinds) and his horde of parademons are after them. Batman/Bruce Wayne (Ben Affleck) needs to bring together a team of heroes to find the Mother Boxes and save the world, so along with Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot) he recruits Aquaman (Jason Momoa), Cyborg (Ray Fisher) and The Flash (Ezra Miller).


Herein lays part of the problem with the film and, whilst I don’t want to become a part of the Marvel vs. DC angry-fan narrative it is almost impossible to talk about Justice League without comparisons to its closest neighbour across the comic book divide. Whereas Marvel’s Avengers Assemble established its heroes before bringing them together (with the exception of Jeremy Renner’s Hawkeye), Justice League opts for a more “wham-bang” introductions on the fly approach. Yes, this approach allows us to get to the pudding a lot quicker, but sometimes you need to deal with the Brussel sprouts before you can get to the bit everybody’s looking forward to. Despite maybe too much exposition, the three new inductees struggle to establish themselves as characters you’d like to see more of. Ezra Miller’s Flash is the quirky likeable one with the one-liners, Jason Momoa is a bit more Aqua-bro than Aquaman and Ray Fisher’s Cyborg is the mysterious, moody one. They’re all good enough, they’re just not interesting enough or fleshed out enough that you really care about them.


Ben Affleck’s Batman is back to being Batman and not the gun-wielding angel of vengeance seen in BvS, but Affleck struggles to bring any conviction to playing him and seems uncomfortable in the part. Thankfully Gal Gadot continues to shine as Wonder Woman and brings some much-needed sanity and humanity to the film. Because his name is right up there in the opening credits I don’t think it’s a spoiler to mention that Henry Cavill returns as Superman/Clark Kent (but is this in flashback form or does he really return? Aha!). Cavill finally seems to have gotten a handle on the character despite battling some dreadful dialogue and an obviously CGI-ed out moustache (apparently, he was recalled for reshoots, had grown the upper-lip furniture for another role and was contractually obliged not to shave it off).

When writer/director Zack Snyder left the project due to a particularly tragic family incident, Warner Bros. brought Avengers Assemble director Joss Whedon onto the film to rework much of it, add additional dialogue and complete filming. Whedon is Hollywood’s go-to guy if you are looking for someone who really understands team dynamics (he has, after all, been in charge of two Avengers movies and was show-runner for television’s Buffy The Vampire Slayer and Firefly) but his lightness of touch is often at odds with Snyder’s more pop-operatic, carefully choreographed, darker action style. I can’t in all certainty say who directed which bit, but I can have a good guess and I’m betting you can too.


Justice League’s main problem is that it feels we got to it too quickly, maybe three films too early: A Flash movie, an Aquabro movie and a proper Affleck Batman movie would have helped tremendously. It doesn’t feel like this universe has paid its dues and it’s all a touch unearned. Also, much like the Marvel films, it lacks a decent villain and maybe should have gone straight in with the real big-bad rather than throw us the morsel of one of his generals (long time comics readers will know who I mean, stick around after the credits if you don’t).

Like I said, it’s not a bad movie, it’s no Suicide Squad but, then again, neither is it a Wonder Woman (which bordered on being great). It’s a bit incoherent, a bit generic and makes you wonder if the superhero genre is wearing a bit thin. Still, if you can’t get enough of CGI characters getting punched maybe you’ll love it. Stranger things have happened.

Andy Oliver

Colchester Remembers

On Sunday 12th November cadets, servicemen and women past and present, and civic dignitaries, paid tribute to our war dead at the remembrance service at Colchester’s War Memorial. They were joined by thousands of Colchester residents who stood side by side with them and lined the High Street.

After the service, at which prayers were said, hymns and the national anthem sung, and a two minute silence observed, soldiers from the 7th Parachute Regiment Royal Horse Artillery, 2nd Battalion The Parachute Regiment, 13th Air Assault Support Regiment Royal Logistic Corps and 16 Medical Regiment marched a route along the High Street.

The parade was led by the Band of the Parachute Regiment who were joined by reservists from 36 (Essex Yeomanry) Signal Squadron, 71 Yeomanry Signal Regiment as well as veterans and youth groups.

Colchester has a proud military tradition and this Remembrance Sunday event seems to be attended by more residents every year.

The video below is edited from a Facebook Live broadcast on his mobile phone from the event by Scott Everest.

Then&Now – Tribute to the Fallen

Last Summer Paris born photographer Xav Marseille gained something of a celebrity status in Colchester when his Then&Now images began appearing on social media and in the press. To create the extraordinary images of Colchester, his adopted town, Xav combined old and new photographs to create stunning fusions of the town as it was in years gone by, and as we know it now in the 21st century. All in one image.

With Remembrance Sunday coming up this weekend Xav has put his talents to good use again to create two extraordinary images as a fitting tribute to the fallen.

In Xav’s own words:

“I was keen to create some exclusive Then&Now artwork for Armistice Day to celebrate and remember what others did to allow us to leave in a free world. As a kid, growing up in France, I was often reminded that our country, and Europe, could’ve been ever so different and I think it’s important not to forget the soldiers who survived but also the ones who didn’t.

Although the old photographs weren’t taken on the same location, I’m hoping these two new ‘Colchester Then&Now’ pieces help make Remembrance Day even more relevant and connect us, visually, to our history.”

If you would like to see more of these amazing photographs, along with Xav’s other work, pay a visit to his website www.about.me/xavmars and follow him on Twitter @XavMars.


Xav Marseille

Xav

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Colchester Classics – Classical Music Picks for November 2017

OUR CLASSICAL MUSIC COLUMNIST LIZ LEATHERDALE, FOUNDER AND OWNER OF COLCHESTER CLASSICS, BRINGS YOU HER PICK OF NOVEMBER’S CLASSICAL MUSIC EVENTS IN, AND AROUND, COLCHESTER.

Classics

This month is crammed full of concerts.  Here are just a few!

CONCERTS IN REMEMBRANCE

This year on Armistice Day, we especially remember the dreadful events of Passchendaele and there will be many commemorative concerts. Many music events will be taking place this weekend to commemorate those who played their part in the two World Wars and more recent conflicts

Lexden Choral Society, accompanied by the Kingfisher Sinfonietta, presents a Remembrance concert including Karl Jenkins’ The Armed Man in the first half of the programme followed by more up-beat British orchestral favourites such Walton’s Crown Imperial and Elgar’s Land of Hope and Glory in the second half.  Saturday November 11 at 7.30pm in St Botolph’s Church, Colchester.

Tickets: £13 (01206 766906) or from Manns Music Shop.

Essex-based Lyston Voices will be performing both Faure’s and Rutter’s Requiems on Sunday November 12 at 6pm in Holy Trinity, Long Melford.

Admission £15, (inclusive of programme & Interval drinks) advance reservations from email:  theoldballroom@gmail.com or at the door from 5.30pm

A Tribute to the Fallen – a Celebration of Freedom is the title of the Suffolk Philharmonic’s concert for Remembrance Sunday including Copland’s Fanfare for the Common Man and Elgar’s Cello Concerto.  Sunday November 12 at 4pm in Ipswich Corn Exchange.

Tickets from £15.

Finally at Saffron Walden’s prestigious Saffron Hall,  The Harlow Chorus, Saffron Walden Choral Society and the Choristers of Jesus College will perform Britten’s powerful and moving War Requiem.  This concert takes place at Saffron Hall on Sunday November 11 at 7.30pm.

Tickets from £15 (0845 548 7650)

SUFFOLK VILLAGES FESTIVAL

In addition to these Remembrance concerts, others are available! Now in its thirtieth year, the Suffolk Villages Festival brings high-quality performances of early music to rural East Anglia. This Sunday (12 November) at 6pm there is a concert of sacred music spanning the religious divide from Monteverdi to Handel. St Peter’s Church, Sudbury.

For further details and full concert programme on this fascinating concert – www.suffolkvillagesfestival.com (01206 366603)

TRIO CON BRIO COPENHAGEN

This weekend there are two opportunities to hear the internationally renowned Trio Con Brio CopenhagenSaturday 11 November at 7.30pm for the Ipswich Chamber Music Society, 7.30pm in the Great Hall in Ipswich School www.ipswichchambermusic.org.uk  and also on Sunday 12 November at 4pm in  St Mary’s Church, East Bergholt  as part of the Stour Valley and Arts concert series

www.svam.org.uk (01206 298426)

 LUNCHTIME RECITALS from Bray Harps, Medieval Looped music to Ondes Martenots!

Leah Stuttard (bray harp, voice, bells) will team up with her duo partner Agnethe Christensen (voice, Nordic lyres, bells) to present a concert that will make you look at the humble hymn in a new way!   Leah and Agnethe explore the origins of Luther’s chorale melodies using versions originally printed for amateurs at home in the Middle Ages and Renaissance and also perform Scandinavian folk hymns, based on Luther’s tunes, but enriched with startling unexpected chromatics and embellishments.

Wednesday November 15 at 1pm at Colchester’s Lion Walk United Reformed Church

And in complete contrast with all of the above, this month there are several Early Music concerts taking place in St Andrew’s Church in Marks Tey. One of them, A Multitude of Minstrels, offers a meander through the life and music of a court minstrel in the Middle ages. Equipped with little more than some harps, lutes, citoles, fiddles and various wind instruments, Colchester’s Early Music group aims to offer an insight in the world of a professional medieval musician.

For further information on these concerts email  lizzie@elizabethgutteridge.co.uk or (01206 212466).

Lizzie Gutteridge is actively involved in Colchester’s Early Music Group and amongst other things, also has her own Consort of 1. She will be playing medieval dance tunes on medieval instruments at Colchester’s Lion Walk United Reformed lunchtime concert series on Wednesday November 22 at 1pm.

For further information on the remainder of concerts in the current series please visit  http://www.lionwalkchurch.org/category/lunchtime-concerts/

Here is a chance to see and hear one of the first electronic instruments, the Ondes Martenot, famously heard in Messiaen’s Turangalia Symphony but used more recently by film composer James Horner and Radiohead. Monday November 13 at 1.10pm at the Theatre Royal Bury St Edmunds.

www.theatreroyal.org  (01284 769505)

ONE- HANDED PIANIST,NICHOLAS McCARTHY

Born without his right hand, piano star Nicholas McCarthy is at the forefront of British music talent, championing accessibility to music for all by using his U.K.

Colchester-based Nicholas is currently touring and promoting his new CD, ‘Echoes’ featuring a cross section from Bach to Rachmaninoff. As a proud Yamaha artist he is delighted to have recorded on the stunning Yamaha flagship Concert Grand CFX.

On Sunday November 19 at 3pm, Nicholas will be performing at Colchester’s St Botolph’s Church.

For full details and to purchase tickets in advance, please click www.nicholasmccarthy.co.uk

SO MANY CONCERTS on 25 and 26 NOVEMBER!

Beethoven’s Missa Solemnis (Latin for solemn mass) is a rare religious outing for the composer. Written just before his famous Ninth Symphony, it has sadly not enjoyed the same level of popular attention.  Some have suggested that the music is better-suited to a concert hall rather than a church while others have compared it with a short opera.  Here is a chance for you to make up your own mind about this beautiful work with soloists Ellie Laugharne, Rebecca Afonwy-Jones, Daniel Joy, Edward Grint, Colchester Choral Society and the Colchester Sinfonia (leader: Jessie Ridley) conducted by Ian Ray.  Saturday November 25 in St Botolph’s Church at 7.30pm

Tickets: £15 from Manns Music or buy on-line www.colchesterchoralsociety.co.uk

On the same evening, music-lovers in Ipswich will be spoilt for choice!

The brilliant young cellist Sheku Kanneh-Mason will perform the work he won the 2016 BBC Young Musician of the Year, the inspiring Shostakovich 1st Cello Concerto. He will be accompanied by the Ipswich Symphony Orchestra in this all-Russian programme including Rachmaninov’s thrilling Symphony No.2. At only 18, Sheku is already a powerful role model for young musicians.

Tickets are free for under 18s – further details (01473 256461) and                 www.ipswichsymphonyorchestra.org

Whiel over at St John’s, Cauldwell Hall Road the Ipswich Bach Choir and Chamber Orchestra will perform music by Mozart including the ‘Coronation’ Mass and his delightful D major Flute Concerto with soloist Mary Blanchard. As an added bonus, soprano Gill Wilson will repeat her celebrated performance of the Queen of the Night’s aria from The Magic Flute.

www.ipswichbachchoir.org.uk

Also on the same Saturday evening the Essex Symphony Orchestra will be presenting another tantalising programme featuring Matilda Lloyd who will be playing Haydn’s Trumpet Concerto. Matilda who has played with the BBC Concert Orchestra and has many accolades to her name including that of BBC Young Musician of the Year 2014 where she was the brass final winner.

www.matildalloyd.com

The orchestra will also be playing Rossini’s ‘The Thieving Magpie’ Overture and Schubert’s Symphony No. 9 in C major ‘Great’. The concert promises to be a fantastic event and we are incredibly lucky to have Matilda as our soloist on the night! Christchurch in New London Road, Chelmsford on Saturday 25 November at 7.30pm.

www.essexsymphony.org.uk

The next day, the Colchester Chamber Choir will be celebrating Thanksgiving with an all-American extravaganza at the Moot Hall, Colchester Town Hall on Sunday November 26 at 6pm. Colchester’s acclaimed Chamber Choir will go Stateside with Simple Gifts in November to celebrate Thanksgiving with an all-American extravaganza guaranteed to get toes tapping.

The town’s Moot Hall will resound to joyful and moving music from the very best of American composers including Aaron Copland’s celebrated Old American Songs in choral arrangement, plus works by Samuel Barber including his famous Sure on this shining night and, from his opera Vanessa, the beautiful Under the willow tree, as well as two unusual settings of Emily Dickinson poems by a young Elliott Carter. Also in the programme are Virgil Thomson’s affecting Four Hymns from the Old South.

The concert is on Sunday 26th November in the Moot Hall, Colchester, starting at 6pm and tickets priced £16 adults, £10 for under-30s and £5 for full time students are on sale online at www.colchesterchamberchoir.org.

And last but by no means least, the Young Musician’s Concert series continues at The Pimlott Foundation with Eleanor Voak (bassoon and contra bassoon) and Katherine Raven (viola) with Dr Ian Ray (piano). The programme will include Vogel: Concerto in C Major for bassoon, Schreck: Sonata Op 9, Schubert: The Bass Nightingale, Rebecca Clarke: Sonata for Viola. Admission free. Donations welcome. Refreshments available.

www.pimlottfoundation.co.uk

Eleanor is 13 years old , and studying for her DipABRSM, and Katherine is a student at the Royal College of Music.

About the Pimlott Foundation’s Education Programme – it provides musical enrichment experiences for both Primary and Secondary School pupils in Essex and also Suffolk.

About the Pimlott Foundation’s Student Sponsorship scheme –  it offers up to £500 each year to sponsor 1 or 2 talented young musicians. We encourage all performing arts, but music should be at the forefront of any application. Sponsorship period to last April 2018-19. Priority will be given to students with East Anglian connections.

If you have a forthcoming concert of classical music, you would like previewed, contact Liz Leatherdale on 0800 999 6994.

Start your love affair with Classical Music at www.colchesterclassics.co.uk and take a minute to watch their company video: 

Liz Leatherdale

 

 

 

 

 

 

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